F&D Cartier
WAIT AND SEE, 1998 to present
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R O S E S

“Roses” R o s e   -   O s e r  -   S e r o   -   E r o s

A major body of work that this closely-knit husband-and-wife artist team has been building up since 1998. Series of photograms — images cast by the sunlight alone as it touches the light-sensitive paper surrounding the carefully chosen objets trouvés placed upon it by the artists.

Martin Gasser     Curator / Swiss Foundation for Photography

Artist Book R O S E S   F&D Cartier, Niggli publishers, 2006   ISBN 10: 3-7212-0600-5

X-Rays, In-Carnation, 1999

X-Rays, In-Carnation, 1999

Unique daylight photogram

B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

photography is reduced to its simplest but most immediate expression. Omitting the camera, the F&D Cartier achieve a quasi “material” likeness of reality, at the very time when the images and world seeking to apprehend it are dematerializing before our very eyes, evanescing into the virtuality of pixels and bytes — be they mega, giga, or otherwise. Martin Gasser

Jour après Jour, November 11, 1998 - August 16, 2001

Jour après Jour, November 11, 1998 - August 16, 2001

Jour après jour (“Day after Day,” November 1998 – August 2001)

a series of photograms that appears to be a way of re-thinking the portrait, by substituting a part for the whole and inscribing it in time: the hair that Françoise’s looses each morning, which she then rolls on to a finger, in a nearly mechanical gesture – this constitutes the subject. The series comprises 1010 images, 15 by 10 centimeters, and the type of B/W R-Coated photographic paper used produces heavy shades of pink, unsaturated, resembling the color of flesh. The artists also keep the sources of the images in little plastic bags, like an inventory of archaeological discoveries, or like the negatives kept by photographers...  

Sylvie Henguely, Art historian, Swiss Foundation for Photography

London Light, April - September 1999

London Light, April - September 1999

Henri Bergson “It’s not time that passes, it’s we who pass.”

This turn to iteration continues in their life in London, where the artists reside from April to September 1999, thanks to a stipend from the Landis & Gyr Foundation. During that visit they create another series based on an objet trouvé , following a slower rhythm this time: London Lightcaptures the light of London during an exceptional summer by means of impressions left by a large paint-brush on photographic paper. Exposed to the natural light, the brush lies for a month on the paper. The colors of the photogram obtained this way differ one from another according to variations in the intensity of the light as the summer advances. Flamboyant like torches in the London night, the brushes join the two artists in a single work that mixes the painting of Françoise and the photography of Daniel. As an attempt to materialize lived time (in London) and to give it a face, the six images of London Light perhaps contain, too, a wink at the famous work of Henri Fox Talbot, The Pencil of Nature(1844/46), comprising several photograms. For their part, F&D Cartier have surreptitiously substituted a brush for Talbot’s pencil. Here, it’s the light which creates the brush, while normally the brush applies the traces of light to the canvas.

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

London Light, April - September 1999

London Light, April - September 1999

Unique series of 6 monthly exposed photograms, while in artists- in -residence in London, through a Landis & Gyr Foundation Award.

B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Danza / Mexican suite, 2000

Danza / Mexican suite, 2000

Death gushes unhindered from the small series named Danza , or Mexican Suite (2000), inspired by a figuring of a skeleton found in the Zócalo market in Mexico City. The photograms created on site (postcards size B/W R-C paper directly exposed in the streets) are striking both in the fragmented ribs of the figure and in the frankness of the forms. Using deliberately reduced formats (15 by 10 centimeters), the dance sketched by Death jerks and halts. The images often line themselves up, and the alternation of torsos and legs gives the saraband a devilish rhythm. Little by little, one starts to hear the clinking of the bones. Danzatries to bring together the divergent attitudes of two cultures toward death, the one Mexican, the other European. The first is expressed in the celebration of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), the other in the medieval danse macabre. While Europe gradually separated life and death, focusing on the one and ignoring the other, in Mexico the two realms continue to interpenetrate in a more organic way. It is this continuity between life and death that fascinates F&D Cartier, and it’s the reason they try to create a synthesis, introducing a Mexican doll into the European dance of death, mixing the pink shades of life with the skeletons of death. As in a shadowy pantomime, the silhouette of the skeleton bends in certain places, stretches menacingly in others or assumes some comically theatrical pose of a danse macabre.

Climax II,  27.04.2002

Climax II, 27.04.2002

Series photograms Climax, 2000-2004

Exposed April 27th, 2002, sunny day, from 12:35 - 20:45

Unique B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 40,6 x 50,8 cm

The feminine body is no longer directly a part of the series of brassieres named Climax . As much a symbol of refinement and luxury as a symbol of women’s oppression in the 1960s, this piece of lingerie is presented differently here, less neatly, than the panties in the previous series. As if oppression and shackles had suddenly fled, the brassieres seem to enjoy newfound liberty. Their dancing images confirm the note of frivolity present in the joyful title, alluding both to the peaks of the breasts and to the height of orgasmic desire. Nevertheless, if the title suggests a summit, the arrangement of brassieres on the paper and of the photographic papers in the exhibition space simulates its corollary, a falling movement, emphasized by way in which the images are hung in a vertical band, with the falling straps blurred by their motion.

B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 40,6 x 50,8 cm

Istituto Svizzero di Roma, 2007

Istituto Svizzero di Roma, 2007

F&D Cartier  Wait and See, personal exhibition

Detail of presentation, Climax and Gown with the wind series

Climax VII, June 11th, 2002

Climax VII, June 11th, 2002

From series Climax 2000-2004

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 40,6 x 50,8 cm

Exposed on June 11th 2002, sunny day, from 09:30 - 12:00

Puzzle J, 02.03.2005

Puzzle J, 02.03.2005

Exposed March 2, 2005, sunny, from 09:30 - 13:30

from series Puzzle, 2001-2005 / 26 subjects from A - Z

The arrangement of the images on a rectangular surface and the varied outlines of the panties suggest a puzzle and its pieces. With its centered triangular forms, this series – Puzzle– looks a little like a well-ordered catalog, asking for comparisons and analyses. The panties spread out on the paper display the richness of their fabrics, like the ponderous wings of rare and delicate specimens in a collection of butterflies. But for its reference to a game of patience, the title of the work might more strongly suggest the verb to puzzle. In fact, while in the images a variety of forms and fabric can be divined, the photogram takes away their materiality, so that they exhibit themselves, undress and elude in a single movement. All the same, their presence exacerbates desire in emphasizing the absence of that which they are thought to hide.

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 40,6 x 50,8 cm

Skopje Press to Exit Gallery, 2011

Skopje Press to Exit Gallery, 2011

from series Puzzle, 2001-2005

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print

Grid 12X 40,6 x 50,8cm

Tulips, 2004

Tulips, 2004

series Roses (2001–2004)

distances itself from this type of structure and shows more casualness in the arrangement of objects. With its organic streak, from a distance this group appears to be the most spontaneous of the ensembles. Tulips, roses, peonies, magnolias, water arums, and many others, from the garden or elsewhere, serve to write an intimate journal of F&D Cartier’s lives and document their affection for plants. The flowers, lethargic or delicately dancing, suggest the elegance of bodies in movement. In a carefree tempo, this series extends other series intimately tied to the artists’ daily life, like Jour après jour , but it distinguishes itself by portraying living, perishable organisms that vanish with the realization of the photogram. Rosescertainly evokes the passing of time, but it seems to manifest no more than the tranquil, natural rhythm of its subjects. The beauty of this series derives perhaps from its mingling of life and death so closely. Among all of the series of photograms, this is the one that synthesizes best the four concepts,

Rose, oser, sero, eros

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Peonis, 2003

Peonis, 2003

from series Roses

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Anémone, 25.01.2002

Anémone, 25.01.2002

from series Roses

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

 

Cosmos, 04.10.2001

Cosmos, 04.10.2001

from series Roses

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Chrysanthemum, 2001

Chrysanthemum, 2001

from series Roses

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Magnolia, 2001

Magnolia, 2001

from series Roses

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Boys do not cry D, 01.02.2003

Boys do not cry D, 01.02.2003

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Boys do not cry K, 01.02.2003

Boys do not cry K, 01.02.2003

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

exposed on Feb. 2, 2003, snow on the ground, from 12:35 - 15:00 

Boys do not cry C, 16 janvier 2003

Boys do not cry C, 16 janvier 2003

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed January 16th, 2001, cloudy, from 11:15 - 12:55

Boys do not cry A, February 22, 2003

Boys do not cry A, February 22, 2003

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed on Feb. 22, 2003, snow on the ground, from 10:30 -14:45

Marie-Line, June 12, 2002

Marie-Line, June 12, 2002

The photograms entitled Someday ... (2001–2005)

suggest pieces of clothing for a Barbie doll, that icon of Western beauty. Much as marketing departments try to individualize the dolls by giving them fashionable surnames, the two artists match each photograph with the name of some actress or celebrity whom they associate with the image, as in Someday, Marie-Line, 2002 . In keeping with their practice of altering things they borrow, they sometimes adjust the names according to their tastes. Childhood dreams are echoed in the dreams offered by Hollywood and its stars. Behind the lightness of this world of vaporous clothing, there is a critique of contemporary society that will become apparent. Questioning the dictates of fashion and its stereotypes, this series also alludes to the myth of Prince Charming. The title is borrowed from a song hummed by Snow White in Walt Disney’s film of the same name (“Someday my prince will come / Someday I’ll find my love / And how thrilling that moment will be / When the prince of my dreams comes to me”).

Series of 18 dresses, some custom made, some created by Françoise as a child.: Alice, Arlette, Barbara, Brigitte, Catherine, Clara, Iris, Jane, Juliet, Lilly, Maria, Marie-Line, Mitsuko, Olga, Pamela, Peggy, Sophie, Stella

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-base silver gelatin, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed from 15:35 -18:00 on that sunny day

 

Sophie, July 16th, 2003

Sophie, July 16th, 2003

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed on July 16, 2003, sunny, from 08:25 - 10:35

*The Selection vfg 01, Acquisition Fotostiftung Schweiz 2002

Brigitte, August 22, 2002

Brigitte, August 22, 2002

from series Someday, 2001 - 2005

 Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed Aug. 22, 2002, sunny, from 09:50 -10:50

*The Selection vfg 01, Acquisition Fotostiftung Schweiz 2002

Pamela, January 19, 2003

Pamela, January 19, 2003

 from series Someday, ...

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed from 13:45 - 16:35, overcast 

*The Selection vfg 01, Acquisition Fotostiftung Schweiz 2002

Olga, April 8, 2002

Olga, April 8, 2002

from series Someday, ...

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed from 09:50 -16:30, overcast

*The Selection vfg 01, Acquisition Fotostiftung Schweiz 2002

Alice, January 22, 2003

Alice, January 22, 2003

 from series Someday, ...

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Exposed on Jan. 22, 2003, overcast, from 10:05 -11:25

*The Selection vfg 01, Acquisition Fotostiftung Schweiz 2002

Shells, from 2004 - 2006

Shells, from 2004 - 2006

 ..in series Shells . Whether they are presented in the form of decorative patterns, like those left by a wave passing over the sand, or as in early works of Werner Bischof that they furtively honor, or arranged in rigorous repetitions, the shells evoke a celestial vault in a play of mirrors, with its constellations and stars half hidden, half emergent from their obscurity. Although... the largest shells, placed again at the center of the image, rather suggest the nebulous forms of an x-rayed skull or organ. And, imperceptibly, we find we have passed from superficial beach litter to unfathomable depths of a galaxy or of our own entrails.

Unique daylight photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Shells, from 2004 - 2006

Shells, from 2004 - 2006

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 50,8 x 40,6 cm

Shells, 2004 -2006

Shells, 2004 -2006

Unique photogram, B/W fibre-based gelatin print, 40,6 x 50,8 cm

Gown with the wind XLII, Aug. 26, 2006 -vintage Mariano Fortuny gown Venice 1910

Gown with the wind XLII, Aug. 26, 2006 -vintage Mariano Fortuny gown Venice 1910

Mixing puns with cinematographic asides, the series Gown with the wind (2005–2006) is the most recent. It adopts large formats in a single presentation. By its subject, it recalls the suspended dolls of Someday , but this time the clothes belong to Françoise Cartier – passed down gowns, a vintage Mariano Fortuny creation, disguises, creations of her own hands, all worn one day or another but long since deposited in some trunk – which F&D Cartier have transferred to paper by impressing, like a sigh, a slight movement on the fabrics. Despite the liveliness of the folds and the careless festivity of the items, the images invite the viewer to mediate on the passing of all things: the loss of loved beings who leave behind only the pale resemblances of their presence, multiple identities that one has abandoned en route like old rags.

Series of 50 unique daylight photograms, exposed from 2005-2006

Gown with the wind, Aug.26, 2006

Unique daylight photogram of a vintage creation by Mariano Fortune (1871 - 1941 Venice), exposed on Aug. 26, 2006, sunshine.

RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

Gown with the wind VIII, June 27, 2005

Gown with the wind VIII, June 27, 2005

Gown with the wind VIII, June 27, 2005

Exposed on a sunny day from 09:30 -  10:00

Unique daylight photogram

RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

 

  Gown with the wind VIII, June 27, 2005    ROSES    F&D Cartier    Museo Vela Ligornetto, 2006  presentation: in its transportation wooden box, directly on the ground.

Gown with the wind VIII, June 27, 2005

ROSES F&D Cartier Museo Vela Ligornetto, 2006

presentation: in its transportation wooden box, directly on the ground.

 Gown with the wind, July 3rd, 2005  Exposed from 09:30 - 09:50, sunny  Unique daylight photogram  RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

Gown with the wind, July 3rd, 2005

Exposed from 09:30 - 09:50, sunny

Unique daylight photogram

RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

  Gown with the wind, June 28th, 2005   Exposed 09:45 - 10:10, sunny  Unique daylight photogram  RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

Gown with the wind, June 28th, 2005

Exposed 09:45 - 10:10, sunny

Unique daylight photogram

RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

  Gown with the wind VLIV, August 28, 2006   Unique daylight photogram  RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

Gown with the wind VLIV, August 28, 2006

Unique daylight photogram

RC-paper, each 125 x 63 x 1 cm, sealed in acrylic glass

from series Cartier's, 2004 - 2006

from series Cartier's, 2004 - 2006

The question of identity that the two artists have repeatedly brought up individually acquires perhaps a much greater immediacy for the entity F&D Cartier. What share falls to each in the work for four hands and two heads? The artists take on this theme with derisive humor in the series Cartier’s (2005–2006). How to distinguish the “genuine” Cartier from the “false”? Does the duo belong to the illustrious clan or not? When does their fame and anonymity begin and end? Such questions are raised by this ensemble, which, less than being a critique of the irresistible magnetism of famous brands, is a play on identities – that of the artists and of the finery that they put on display. Collected by Françoise Cartier in the course of time and on many trips, necklaces with opulent or slender forms, classic or baroque silhouettes, affirm their distinctive characters without revealing their specific materiality. The pink background recalls, to be sure, the skin that the necklaces decorate. The infinite and unpredictable variations of shading in the photograms are a comment, as it were, on the diversity of the human genome: concerning individuals, each pink is unique. But this sustained, brilliant color, like the whiteness of the non-exposed areas, lends the objects an aura of glamor and sophistication appropriate to jewels of the eponymous brand.

Each is titled after a Cartier vintage jewel.

Adorno, Alice, Amber, Azahar, Beeds, Black and White, Bleu, Braise, Cauris, Chain, Chimère, Chrysanthème, Circle, Gao, Gray, Gri Gri, Hana-Bi, Ice Cubes, Idaz, Incas, Infini, Isis, Jaisingh, Lapis Lazuli, Mayas, Méduse, Pagoda, Plata, Puff, Tangerine, Triangle, Tutti-Frutti, Venice.

33 Unique daylight photograms

from left to right: Chain, 21.07.2004 / Hana-Bi, 04.01.2004 / Tutti-Frutti, 04.01.2004

Unique daylight photograms, B/W fibre-based gelatin prints 30x24cm

 from series  Cartier's   left - right: Infini, 19.07.04, / Chrysanthème,21.07.04 / Chimère 19.07.2004  Unique daylight photograms, B/W fibre-based gelatin prints 30x24cm

from series Cartier's

left - right: Infini, 19.07.04, / Chrysanthème,21.07.04 / Chimère 19.07.2004

Unique daylight photograms, B/W fibre-based gelatin prints 30x24cm

 from series  Cartier's   left - right: Azahar, 04.01.04 / Adorno, 10.01.04 / Venice, 06.01.04  Unique daylight photograms, B/W fibre-based gelatin prints 30x24cm

from series Cartier's

left - right: Azahar, 04.01.04 / Adorno, 10.01.04 / Venice, 06.01.04

Unique daylight photograms, B/W fibre-based gelatin prints 30x24cm

 from series Cartier's  special home made presentation frames  white distanced wood, acrylglas and screws.

from series Cartier's

special home made presentation frames

white distanced wood, acrylglas and screws.

 ROSES    F&D Cartier      Galleria Consarc Chiasso, Suisse , 2007  presentation of the  Cartier's  sries

ROSES    F&D Cartier     Galleria Consarc Chiasso, Suisse, 2007

presentation of the Cartier's sries